GALILEO GALILEI FOUNDATION
WORLD FEDERATION OF SCIENTISTS
ETTORE MAJORANA FOUNDATION AND CENTRE FOR SCIENTIFIC CULTURE

GALILEO GALILEI CELEBRATIONS
Four Centuries Since the Birth of MODERN SCIENCE


INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL FOR THE STUDY OF WRITTEN RECORDS


12th Course: TALKING TO THE TEXT:

MARGINALIA FROM PAPYRI TO PRINT


in collaboration with the

UNIVERSITY OF MESSINA

 

ERICE-SICILY: 26 SEPTEMBER - 3 OCTOBER 1998


Sponsored by the:


PROGRAMME AND LECTURERS

Saluti

 

"La serva padrona". Interazioni fra testo e glossa sulla pagina del manoscritto

 

I lettori dei papiri: dal commento autonomo agli scolii

 

Passato e presente nei marginalia bizantini

 

La piccola comunità di Ivrea (sec. VIII - XI): a turno copisti, compilatori, postillatori

 

Boethius at school in medieval and Renaissance Italy: manuscript glosses to the Consolation of Philosophy

 

Ecrites au 9e, perdues au 20e, retrouvées au 15e: des gloses du Vegetius De re militari

 

L'uso dei margini tra scuola e filologia

 

From English margins (c. 1100-1300)

 

Misunderstanding marginalia

 

Les marginalia dans les textes philosophiques universitaires médiévaux

 

Marginal illustrations in a thirteenth-century encyclopedia: Thomas of Cantimpré's De natura rerum

 

Plurilinguismo sui margini dei manoscritti di Giovenale

 

Marginalia umanistici e "tradizione platonica".

 

Un inglese a Firenze durante il Concilio: Andrew Holes e i suoi manoscritti

 

Annotazioni all'Antologia greca nella tradizione manoscritta e a stampa

 

Marginalia giuridici: dai manoscritti agli incunaboli

 

Apografi di postillati del Poliziano: vicende e fruizioni

 

Parrasio, Bembo, Guevara: tre esempi sull'uso dei marginalia

 

Il Tasso e la tipografia. Postille, estratti, scritture originali

 

I postillati monacensi di Pier Vettori: una stampa delle tragedie di Sofocle

 

Un Livio postillato durante la Rivoluzione Francese

 

Conclusions

Round Table (Chairman p. Leonard Boyle, Rome) on "Cataloguing Annotated Books"; there will be contributions by R. BABCOCK (Yale University Library, USA), O. BESOMI (University of Zurich, Switzerland), L. BOYLE (Rome, Italy), M. DAVIES (British Library, London, UK), K. JENSEN (Bodleian Library, Oxford, UK), B. WAGNER (Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, Munich, Germany)


PURPOSE OF THE COURSE

The aim of the Course is to lay out a broad map of current research on the history of marginalia and to explore the different kinds of response to texts that readers at various times and in various environments have left on record in their copies. The examples will largely be taken from unpublished material.

The main connecting thread will be provided by concentrating on the Greek and Latin tradition from the period of papyri to the Enlightenment, from Byzantium to the early printers. A phenomenon that perhaps reached its fullest development in the Middle Ages and Renaissance will be examined from various angles and a range of problems addressed.


POETIC TOUCH

According to legend, Erice, son of Venus and Neptune, founded a small town on top of a mountain (750 metres above sea level) more than three thousand years ago. The founder of modern history &emdash; i.e. the recording of events in a systematic and chronological sequence as they really happened without reference to mythical causes &emdash; the great Thucydides (~500 B.C.), writing about events connected with the conquest of Troy (1183 B.C.) and the escape by sea towards the West, said that the Elymi &emdash; founders of Erice &emdash; were survivors from the destruction of Troy. This inspired Virgil to describe the arrival of the Troyan royal family in Erice and the burial of Anchises, by his son Enea, on the coast below Erice. Homer (~1000 B.C.), Theocritus (~300 B.C.), Polybius (~200 B.C.), Virgil (~50 B.C.), Horace (~20 B.C.), and others have celebrated this magnificent spot in Sicily in their poems. During seven centuries (XIII-XIX) the town of Erice was under the leadership of a local oligarchy, whose wisdom assured a long period of cultural development and economic prosperity which in turn gave rise to the many churches, monasteries and private palaces which you see today.

In Erice you can admire the Castle of Venus, the Cyclopean Walls (~800 B.C.) and the Gothic Cathedral (~1300 A.D.). Erice is at present a mixture of ancient and medieval architecture. Other masterpieces of ancient civilization are to be found in the neighbourhood: at Motya (Phoenician), Segesta (Elymian), and Selinunte (Greek). On the Aegadian Islands &emdash; theatre of the decisive naval battle of the first Punic War (264-241 B.C.) &emdash; suggestive neolithic and paleolithic vestiges are still visible: the grottoes of Favignana, the carvings and murals of Levanzo.

Splendid beaches are to be found at San Vito Lo Capo, Scopello, and Cornino, and a wild and rocky coast around Monte Cofano: all at less than one hour's drive from Erice.


GENERAL INFORMATION

Prospective participants should write to:

Closing date for application: June 15, 1998

The total fee, which includes full board and lodging (arranged by the School), is US $700. Thanks to the generosity of the sponsoring Institutions, partial support can be granted to some deserving students who need financial help. Requests to this effect must be specified and justified in the letter of application.

Admission to the Course and decision about bursaries will be communicated by the Directors of the Course, at the latest during the month of July, 1998.

Participants must arrive in Erice on September 26, no later than 5 pm. More detailed information will be sent to successful applicants together with the letter of acceptance.

G. CAVALLO - J.O. TJÄDER
DIRECTORS OF THE SCHOOL

 

V. FERA - G. FERRAÙ - S. RIZZO
DIRECTORS OF THE COURSE

 

A. ZICHICHI
DIRECTOR OF THE CENTRE